St Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland. It doesn’t matter that he’s not born Irish, he was actually born in Roman Britain (which is strangely apt as we shall see). When he was just a child, he was taken by Irish raiding parties to Ireland and shipped as a slave to farm and tend sheep in the county. It was during that time that he learned his true faith, ultimately finding strength in his relation to God through his work.

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Whilst the purpose of celebrating St Patrick might seem to be about his converting the Pagan Irish to Christianly it’s more about celebrating Ireland itself and being of Irish heritage. Not that it seems to matter, on the 15 March everyone has some Irish heritage somewhere.  Although Christians celebrate the day as well there’s is also a more muted response to the sudden rise in Guinness and whisky consumption.

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Today, March 15th is officially recognised as St Patrick’s Day. Although the date never changes, the celebration typically involves the wearing of green hats and clothes and even some Aran Sweaters from Shamrock Gift and listening to traditional Irish music with a pot of green beer as the main feast. The celebration is most dominant abroad in cities like Chicargo and New York in the USA and Sydney in Australia (where they even turn the Opera house Green). It’s only in recent years that the Irish themselves have started to celebrate strongly in Dublin, Galway and and Kerry.